Vernacular languages in the long ninth century

vernaculaire affiche

 

 

The long ninth century was an important period for the history of vernacular languages in Europe in both Eastern and Western Christendom. Some of those languages appeared for the first time in written form and others changed considerably. This conference will compare and contrast the different histories of a wide variety of languages in this period including Old English, Old Norse, Frisian, Slavonic, Old Irish and Old High German. We will address questions such as: To what extent were their histories inter-connected? Why was this happening in the ninth century? To what extent was this mainly a religious and elite phenomenon or was it more widespread? 

Speakers include: Alban Gautier (Université de Caen Normandie), Robert Gallagher (University of Oxford), Francesca Tinti (Universidad del País Vasco), Judith Jesch (University of Nottingham), Bianca Patria (Universitetet i Oslo), Marco Mostert (Universiteit Utrecht), Helen Gittos (University of Oxford), Martin Gravel (Université Paris VIII Vincennes Saint-Denis), Katy Cubitt (University of East Anglia), Máire Ní Mhaonaigh (University of Cambridge), Elizabeth Tyler (University of York), Anna Adamska (Universiteit Utrecht), Thomas Lienhard (Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne), Mirela Ivanova (University of Oxford), David Kalhous (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften), Magali Coumert (Université de Bretagne occidentale, Brest), Jens Scheider (Université Paris Est Marne-la-Vallée), Christine Rauer (University of St Andrews), Ciaran Arthur (Queen’s University, Belfast), Élise Louviot (Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne), Pierre-Yves Lambert (École pratique des hautes études, Paris), Nicolai Egjar Engesland (Universitetet i Oslo), and Benoît Grévin (Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Paris).

Conference Programme

 

Thursday 28th June

13:00 Registration


13.30 Introduction

Alban Gautier (Université de Caen Normandie), Introduction


14.00 Old English

Robert Gallagher (University of Oxford), Old English in Ninth-Century Anglo-Saxon Charters: When, Where and Why?

Francesca Tinti (Universidad del País Vasco), Qui nominatur nostra propria lingua: flagging code-switching in Anglo-Saxon charters


15.00   Coffee


15.30 Old Norse and Frisian

Judith Jesch (University of Nottingham), Memorial rune-stones and the early Viking Age

Bianca Patria (Universitetet i Oslo), Skaldic innovations: foreign influences and traditional formsin the development of a new poetic language in ninth century Scandinavia

Marco Mostert (Universiteit Utrecht), The Frisian exception. Why are there hardly any traces of written Frisian from the eighth and ninth century?


17.00 Discussion


19.00   Dinner

Friday 29th June

09.00 Liturgy and Preaching

Helen Gittos (University of Oxford), Liturgy in Vernacular Languages in the early Middle Ages

Martin Gravel (Université Paris VIII Vincennes Saint-Denis), Translating chapter 17 from the Acts of the council of Tours (813): reconsidering the shift from Latin to proto-roman languages

Katy Cubitt (University of East Anglia), Vernacular penance and confessional prayers in the tenth-century: some questions of datin

10.30 Coffee


11.00 Two Kings and their Networks

Máire Ní Mhaonaigh (University of Cambridge) & Elizabeth Tyler (University of York), Insular historiographies and theorising the vernacular: an entangled approach


12.00 — Discussion


12.45 — Lunch


14.00 Slavic languages and Eastern Christianities 1

Thomas Lienhard (Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne), L’apparition du slavon écrit : où et pourquoi ? (v. 860 – v. 925)

Mirela Ivanova (University of Oxford), Inventing and defending the Slavonic written word in early medieval Bulgaria

Anna Adamska (Universiteit Utrecht), A missed opportunity? Fortunes and misfortunes of the Slavic written vernaculars beyond the ninth century


15.30   Coffee


16.00 Slavic languages and Eastern Christianities 2

David Kalhous (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften), Legitimizing the vernacular. Old Church Slavonic as a liturgical language and its defence in ninth and tenth century hagiography

Georgian slot (to be confirmed)


17.00   Discussion


19:00   Dinner

Saturday 30th June

09.00 Texts and Contexts

Magali Coumert (Université de Bretagne occidentale, Brest) & Jens Scheider (Université Paris Est Marne-la-Vallée), Lex Salica between oral and manuscript tradition

Christine Rauer (University of St Andrews), Continental and Irish models for ninth-century Anglo-Saxon hagiography?

Ciaran Arthur (Queen’s University, Belfast), 'The Heliand in Anglo-Saxon England: Translation, Transmission, and Turbulence'.

Élise Louviot (Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne), Heliand’s and Otfrid von Weissenburg’s Evangelienbuch’s handling of direct speech: a common vernacular model?


11:00 Coffee


11.30 From Old to Middle Irish

Élise louviot, Heliand’s and Otfrid von Weissenburg’s Evangelienbuch’s handling of direct speech: a common vernacular model?

Nicolai Egjar Engesland (Universitetet i Oslo), Re-contextualizing the Auraicept na nÉces


12.30 Discussion


13:00 Concluding remarks by Benoît Grévin (Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Paris)

 

 

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