Professor Howard Hotson

My research falls primarily within the field of early modern European intellectual history, with particular attention to central Europe and the international Reformed world c.1550-1660. Thematically, I have written on the histories of science, philosophy, religion, education, and political theory and their relationship to broader social, political, and confessional developments. At the heart of my interests are the gradually expanding reform movements of the post-Reformation period culminating in the pansophism of Comenius, the universal reform programme of Samuel Hartlib, and the audacious philosophical projects of Leibniz. I am currently working on traditions of religious non-conformity in the Holy Roman Empire in the post-Reformation period, pedagogical innovations linking Ramus to Comenius and Leibniz and a book on the intellectual diaspora of the Thirty Years War. I also direct the Oxford-based collaborative research project, 'Cultures of Knowledge: Networking the Republic of Letters, 1550-1750'.

  • Arianism and Millenarianism: The Link between Two Heresies from Servetus to Socinus

  • The Reformation of Common Learning

  • Arbor sanguinis, arbor disciplinarum: the Intellectual Genealogy of Johann Heinrich Alsted.

  • Die Herborner 'Encylopaedia septem tomis distincta' von Johann Heinrich Alsted. Nassauischer Ursprung und internationale Rezeption.

  • The Ramist Roots of Comenian Pansophia

  • Paradise Postponed: Johann Heinrich Alsted and the Birth of Calvinist Millenarianism

  • A “Generall Reformation of Common Learning” and its Reception in the English-Speaking World, 1560-1642

  • Anti-Semitism, Philo-Semitism, Apocalypticism and Millenarianism in Early Modern Europe: A Case Study and some Methodological Reflections

  • Central Europe, 1550-1700

  • Commonplace Learning: Ramism and Its German Ramifications, 1543-1630

  • More
List of site pages